Simplest code for array intersection in javascript


What's the simplest, library-free code for implementing array intersections in javascript? I want to write

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5])

and get

[2, 3]

Use a combination of Array.prototype.filter and Array.prototype.indexOf:

array1.filter(value => -1 !== array2.indexOf(value))

Or as vrugtehagel suggested in the comments, you can use the more recent Array.prototype.includes for even simpler code:

array1.filter(value => array2.includes(value))

For older browsers:

array1.filter(function(n) {
    return array2.indexOf(n) !== -1;
});

Destructive seems simplest, especially if we can assume the input is sorted:

/* destructively finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *  State of input arrays is undefined when
 *  the function returns.  They should be 
 *  (prolly) be dumped.
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length, b.length)
 */
function intersection_destructive(a, b)
{
  var result = [];
  while( a.length > 0 && b.length > 0 )
  {  
     if      (a[0] < b[0] ){ a.shift(); }
     else if (a[0] > b[0] ){ b.shift(); }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a.shift());
       b.shift();
     }
  }

  return result;
}

Non-destructive has to be a hair more complicated, since we’ve got to track indices:

/* finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length(), b.length())
 */
function intersect_safe(a, b)
{
  var ai=0, bi=0;
  var result = [];

  while( ai < a.length && bi < b.length )
  {
     if      (a[ai] < b[bi] ){ ai++; }
     else if (a[ai] > b[bi] ){ bi++; }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a[ai]);
       ai++;
       bi++;
     }
  }

  return result;
}

If your environment supports ECMAScript 6 Set, one simple and supposedly efficient (see specification link) way:

function intersect(a, b) {
  var setA = new Set(a);
  var setB = new Set(b);
  var intersection = new Set([...setA].filter(x => setB.has(x)));
  return Array.from(intersection);
}

Shorter, but less readable (also without creating the additional intersection Set):

function intersect(a, b) {
      return [...new Set(a)].filter(x => new Set(b).has(x));
}

Avoiding a new Set from b every time:

function intersect(a, b) {
      var setB = new Set(b);
      return [...new Set(a)].filter(x => setB.has(x));
}

Note that when using sets you will only get distinct values, thus new Set[1,2,3,3].size evaluates to 3.


Using Underscore.js or lodash.js

_.intersection( [0,345,324] , [1,0,324] )  // gives [0,324]

My contribution in ES6 terms. In general it finds the intersection of an array with indefinite number of arrays provided as arguments.

Array.prototype.intersect = function(...a) {
  return [this,...a].reduce((p,c) => p.filter(e => c.includes(e)));
}
var arrs = [[0,2,4,6,8],[4,5,6,7],[4,6]],
     arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

document.write("<pre>" + JSON.stringify(arr.intersect(...arrs)) + "</pre>");


// Return elements of array a that are also in b in linear time:
function intersect(a, b) {
  return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

// Example:
console.log(intersect([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

I recommend above succinct solution which outperforms other implementations on large inputs. If performance on small inputs matters, check the alternatives below.

Alternatives and performance comparison:

See the following snippet for alternative implementations and check https://jsperf.com/array-intersection-comparison for performance comparisons.

function intersect_for(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const alen = a.length;
  const blen = b.length;
  for (let i = 0; i < alen; ++i) {
    const ai = a[i];
    for (let j = 0; j < blen; ++j) {
      if (ai === b[j]) {
        result.push(ai);
        break;
      }
    }
  } 
  return result;
}

function intersect_filter_indexOf(a, b) {
  return a.filter(el => b.indexOf(el) !== -1);
}

function intersect_filter_in(a, b) {
  const map = b.reduce((map, el) => {map[el] = true; return map}, {});
  return a.filter(el => el in map);
}

function intersect_for_in(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const map = {};
  for (let i = 0, length = b.length; i < length; ++i) {
    map[b[i]] = true;
  }
  for (let i = 0, length = a.length; i < length; ++i) {
    if (a[i] in map) result.push(a[i]);
  }
  return result;
}

function intersect_filter_includes(a, b) {
  return a.filter(el => b.includes(el));
}

function intersect_filter_has_this(a, b) {
  return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

function intersect_filter_has_arrow(a, b) {
  const set = new Set(b);
  return a.filter(el => set.has(el));
}

function intersect_for_has(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const set = new Set(b);
  for (let i = 0, length = a.length; i < length; ++i) {
    if (set.has(a[i])) result.push(a[i]);
  }
  return result;
}

Results in Firefox 53:

  • Ops/sec on large arrays (10,000 elements):

    filter + has (this)               523 (this answer)
    for + has                         482
    for-loop + in                     279
    filter + in                       242
    for-loops                          24
    filter + includes                  14
    filter + indexOf                   10
    
  • Ops/sec on small arrays (100 elements):

    for-loop + in                 384,426
    filter + in                   192,066
    for-loops                     159,137
    filter + includes             104,068
    filter + indexOf               71,598
    filter + has (this)            43,531 (this answer)
    filter + has (arrow function)  35,588
    

How about just using associative arrays?

function intersect(a, b) {
    var d1 = {};
    var d2 = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        d1[a[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
        d2[b[j]] = true;
    }
    for (var k in d1) {
        if (d2[k]) 
            results.push(k);
    }
    return results;
}

edit:

// new version
function intersect(a, b) {
    var d = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        d[b[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < a.length; j++) {
        if (d[a[j]]) 
            results.push(a[j]);
    }
    return results;
}

  1. Sort it
  2. check one by one from the index 0, create new array from that.

Something like this, Not tested well though.

function intersection(x,y){
 x.sort();y.sort();
 var i=j=0;ret=[];
 while(i<x.length && j<y.length){
  if(x[i]<y[j])i++;
  else if(y[j]<x[i])j++;
  else {
   ret.push(x[i]);
   i++,j++;
  }
 }
 return ret;
}

alert(intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

PS:The algorithm only intended for Numbers and Normal Strings, intersection of arbitary object arrays may not work.


The performance of @atk's implementation for sorted arrays of primitives can be improved by using .pop rather than .shift.

function intersect(array1, array2) {
   var result = [];
   // Don't destroy the original arrays
   var a = array1.slice(0);
   var b = array2.slice(0);
   var aLast = a.length - 1;
   var bLast = b.length - 1;
   while (aLast >= 0 && bLast >= 0) {
      if (a[aLast] > b[bLast] ) {
         a.pop();
         aLast--;
      } else if (a[aLast] < b[bLast] ){
         b.pop();
         bLast--;
      } else /* they're equal */ {
         result.push(a.pop());
         b.pop();
         aLast--;
         bLast--;
      }
   }
   return result;
}

I created a benchmark using jsPerf: http://bit.ly/P9FrZK. It's about three times faster to use .pop.


Using jQuery:

var a = [1,2,3];
var b = [2,3,4,5];
var c = $(b).not($(b).not(a));
alert(c);

For arrays containing only strings or numbers you can do something with sorting, as per some of the other answers. For the general case of arrays of arbitrary objects I don't think you can avoid doing it the long way. The following will give you the intersection of any number of arrays provided as parameters to arrayIntersection:

var arrayContains = Array.prototype.indexOf ?
    function(arr, val) {
        return arr.indexOf(val) > -1;
    } :
    function(arr, val) {
        var i = arr.length;
        while (i--) {
            if (arr[i] === val) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    };

function arrayIntersection() {
    var val, arrayCount, firstArray, i, j, intersection = [], missing;
    var arrays = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); // Convert arguments into a real array

    // Search for common values
    firstArray = arrays.pop();
    if (firstArray) {
        j = firstArray.length;
        arrayCount = arrays.length;
        while (j--) {
            val = firstArray[j];
            missing = false;

            // Check val is present in each remaining array 
            i = arrayCount;
            while (!missing && i--) {
                if ( !arrayContains(arrays[i], val) ) {
                    missing = true;
                }
            }
            if (!missing) {
                intersection.push(val);
            }
        }
    }
    return intersection;
}

arrayIntersection( [1, 2, 3, "a"], [1, "a", 2], ["a", 1] ); // Gives [1, "a"]; 

It's pretty short using ES2015 and Sets. Accepts Array-like values like a String and removes duplicates.

let intersection = function(a, b) {
  a = new Set(a), b = new Set(b);
  return [...a].filter(v => b.has(v));
};

console.log(intersection([1,2,1,2,3], [2,3,5,4,5,3]));

console.log(intersection('ccaabbab', 'addb').join(''));


A tiny tweak to the smallest one here (the filter/indexOf solution), namely creating an index of the values in one of the arrays using a JavaScript object, will reduce it from O(N*M) to "probably" linear time. source1 source2

function intersect(a, b) {
  var aa = {};
  a.forEach(function(v) { aa[v]=1; });
  return b.filter(function(v) { return v in aa; });
}

This isn't the very simplest solution (it's more code than filter+indexOf), nor is it the very fastest (probably slower by a constant factor than intersect_safe()), but seems like a pretty good balance. It is on the very simple side, while providing good performance, and it doesn't require pre-sorted inputs.


Another indexed approach able to process any number of arrays at once:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
            index[v]++;
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

It works only for values that can be evaluated as strings and you should pass them as an array like:

intersect ([arr1, arr2, arr3...]);

...but it transparently accepts objects as parameter or as any of the elements to be intersected (always returning array of common values). Examples:

intersect ({foo: [1, 2, 3, 4], bar: {a: 2, j:4}}); // [2, 4]
intersect ([{x: "hello", y: "world"}, ["hello", "user"]]); // ["hello"]

EDIT: I just noticed that this is, in a way, slightly buggy.

That is: I coded it thinking that input arrays cannot itself contain repetitions (as provided example doesn't).

But if input arrays happen to contain repetitions, that would produce wrong results. Example (using below implementation):

intersect ([[1, 3, 4, 6, 3], [1, 8, 99]]);
// Expected: [ '1' ]
// Actual: [ '1', '3' ]

Fortunately this is easy to fix by simply adding second level indexing. That is:

Change:

        if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
        index[v]++;

by:

        if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = {};
        index[v][i] = true; // Mark as present in i input.

...and:

         if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);

by:

         if (Object.keys(index[i]).length == arrLength) retv.push(i);

Complete example:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = {};
            index[v][i] = true; // Mark as present in i input.
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (Object.keys(index[i]).length == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

intersect ([[1, 3, 4, 6, 3], [1, 8, 99]]); // [ '1' ]

function intersection(A,B){
var result = new Array();
for (i=0; i<A.length; i++) {
    for (j=0; j<B.length; j++) {
        if (A[i] == B[j] && $.inArray(A[i],result) == -1) {
            result.push(A[i]);
        }
    }
}
return result;
}

With some restrictions on your data, you can do it in linear time!

For positive integers: use an array mapping the values to a "seen/not seen" boolean.

function intersectIntegers(array1,array2) { 
   var seen=[],
       result=[];
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     seen[array1[i]] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if ( seen[array2[i]])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   return result;
}

There is a similar technique for objects: take a dummy key, set it to "true" for each element in array1, then look for this key in elements of array2. Clean up when you're done.

function intersectObjects(array1,array2) { 
   var result=[];
   var key="tmpKey_intersect"
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     array1[i][key] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if (array2[i][key])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     delete array1[i][key];
   }
   return result;
}

Of course you need to be sure the key didn't appear before, otherwise you'll be destroying your data...


You could use a Set as thisArg of Array#filter and take Set#has as callback.

function intersection(a, b) {
    return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

console.log(intersection([1, 2, 3], [2, 3, 4, 5]));


You can use (for all browsers except IE):

const intersection = array1.filter(element => array2.includes(element));

or for IE :

const intersection = array1.filter(element => array2.indexOf(element) !== -1);

I'll contribute with what has been working out best for me:

if (!Array.prototype.intersect){
Array.prototype.intersect = function (arr1) {

    var r = [], o = {}, l = this.length, i, v;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        o[this[i]] = true;
    }
    l = arr1.length;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        v = arr1[i];
        if (v in o) {
            r.push(v);
        }
    }
    return r;
};
}

"indexOf" for IE 9.0, chrome, firefox, opera,

    function intersection(a,b){
     var rs = [], x = a.length;
     while (x--) b.indexOf(a[x])!=-1 && rs.push(a[x]);
     return rs.sort();
    }

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]);
//Result:  [2,3]

This is probably the simplest one, besides list1.filter(n => list2.includes(n))

var list1 = ['bread', 'ice cream', 'cereals', 'strawberry', 'chocolate']
var list2 = ['bread', 'cherry', 'ice cream', 'oats']

function check_common(list1, list2){
	
	list3 = []
	for (let i=0; i<list1.length; i++){
		
		for (let j=0; j<list2.length; j++){	
			if (list1[i] === list2[j]){
				list3.push(list1[i]);				
			}		
		}
		
	}
	return list3
	
}

check_common(list1, list2) // ["bread", "ice cream"]


'use strict'

// Example 1
function intersection(a1, a2) {
    return a1.filter(x => a2.indexOf(x) > -1)
}

// Example 2 (prototype function)
Array.prototype.intersection = function(arr) {
    return this.filter(x => arr.indexOf(x) > -1)
} 

const a1 = [1, 2, 3]
const a2 = [2, 3, 4, 5]

console.log(intersection(a1, a2))
console.log(a1.intersection(a2))


A functional approach with ES2015

A functional approach must consider using only pure functions without side effects, each of which is only concerned with a single job.

These restrictions enhance the composability and reusability of the functions involved.

// small, reusable auxiliary functions

const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));
const apply = f => x => f(x);


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];


// run it

console.log( intersect(xs) (ys) );

Please note that the native Set type is used, which has an advantageous lookup performance.

Avoid duplicates

Obviously repeatedly occurring items from the first Array are preserved, while the second Array is de-duplicated. This may be or may be not the desired behavior. If you need a unique result just apply dedupe to the first argument:

// auxiliary functions

const apply = f => x => f(x);
const comp = f => g => x => f(g(x));
const afrom = apply(Array.from);
const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// de-duplication

const dedupe = comp(afrom) (createSet);


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];


// unique result

console.log( intersect(dedupe(xs)) (ys) );

Compute the intersection of any number of Arrays

If you want to compute the intersection of an arbitrarily number of Arrays just compose intersect with foldl. Here is a convenience function:

// auxiliary functions

const apply = f => x => f(x);
const uncurry = f => (x, y) => f(x) (y);
const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));
const foldl = f => acc => xs => xs.reduce(uncurry(f), acc);


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// intersection of an arbitrarily number of Arrays

const intersectn = (head, ...tail) => foldl(intersect) (head) (tail);


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];
const zs = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6];


// run

console.log( intersectn(xs, ys, zs) );


For simplicity:

// Usage
const intersection = allLists
  .reduce(intersect, allValues)
  .reduce(removeDuplicates, []);


// Implementation
const intersect = (intersection, list) =>
  intersection.filter(item =>
    list.some(x => x === item));

const removeDuplicates = (uniques, item) =>
  uniques.includes(item) ? uniques : uniques.concat(item);


// Example Data
const somePeople = [bob, doug, jill];
const otherPeople = [sarah, bob, jill];
const morePeople = [jack, jill];

const allPeople = [...somePeople, ...otherPeople, ...morePeople];
const allGroups = [somePeople, otherPeople, morePeople];

// Example Usage
const intersection = allGroups
  .reduce(intersect, allPeople)
  .reduce(removeDuplicates, []);

intersection; // [jill]

Benefits:

  • dirt simple
  • data-centric
  • works for arbitrary number of lists
  • works for arbitrary lengths of lists
  • works for arbitrary types of values
  • works for arbitrary sort order
  • retains shape (order of first appearance in any array)
  • exits early where possible
  • memory safe, short of tampering with Function / Array prototypes

Drawbacks:

  • higher memory usage
  • higher CPU usage
  • requires an understanding of reduce
  • requires understanding of data flow

You wouldn't want to use this for 3D engine or kernel work, but if you have problems getting this to run in an event-based app, your design has bigger problems.


.reduce to build a map, and .filter to find the intersection. delete within the .filter allows us to treat the second array as though it's a unique set.

function intersection (a, b) {
  var seen = a.reduce(function (h, k) {
    h[k] = true;
    return h;
  }, {});

  return b.filter(function (k) {
    var exists = seen[k];
    delete seen[k];
    return exists;
  });
}

I find this approach pretty easy to reason about. It performs in constant time.


If you need to have it handle intersecting multiple arrays:

const intersect = (a, b, ...rest) => {
  if (rest.length === 0) return [...new Set(a)].filter(x => new Set(b).has(x));
  return intersect(a, intersect(b, ...rest));
};

console.log(intersect([1,2,3,4,5], [1,2], [1, 2, 3,4,5], [2, 10, 1])) // [1,2]


ES6 style simple way.

const intersection = (a, b) => {
  const s = new Set(b);
  return a.filter(x => s.has(x));
};

Example:

intersection([1, 2, 3], [4, 3, 2]); // [2, 3]

Here is underscore.js implementation:

_.intersection = function(array) {
  if (array == null) return [];
  var result = [];
  var argsLength = arguments.length;
  for (var i = 0, length = array.length; i < length; i++) {
    var item = array[i];
    if (_.contains(result, item)) continue;
    for (var j = 1; j < argsLength; j++) {
      if (!_.contains(arguments[j], item)) break;
    }
    if (j === argsLength) result.push(item);
  }
  return result;
};

Source: http://underscorejs.org/docs/underscore.html#section-62


function getIntersection(arr1, arr2){
    var result = [];
    arr1.forEach(function(elem){
        arr2.forEach(function(elem2){
            if(elem === elem2){
                result.push(elem);
            }
        });
    });
    return result;
}

getIntersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]); // [ 2, 3 ]

Rather using indexOf you can also use Array.protype.includes.

function intersection(arr1, arr2) {
  return arr1.filter((ele => {
    return arr2.includes(ele);
  }));
}

console.log(intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));


Think this will be faster with O(array1+array2) time assuming map.has() is ~O(1).Please correct me if wrong.

const intersection = (a1, a2) => {
  let map = new Map();
  let result = []
  for (let i of a1) {
    if (!map.has(i)) map.set(i, true);
  }
  for (let i of a2) {
    if (map.has(i)) result.push(i)
  }
  return result;
}


I have written an intesection function which can even detect intersection of array of objects based on particular property of those objects.

For instance,

if arr1 = [{id: 10}, {id: 20}]
and arr2 =  [{id: 20}, {id: 25}]

and we want intersection based on the id property, then the output should be :

[{id: 20}]

As such, the function for the same (note: ES6 code) is :

const intersect = (arr1, arr2, accessors = [v => v, v => v]) => {
    const [fn1, fn2] = accessors;
    const set = new Set(arr2.map(v => fn2(v)));
    return arr1.filter(value => set.has(fn1(value)));
};

and you can call the function as:

intersect(arr1, arr2, [elem => elem.id, elem => elem.id])

Also note: this function finds intersection considering the first array is the primary array and thus the intersection result will be that of the primary array.


Create an Object using one array and loop through the second array to check if the value exists as key.

function intersection(arr1, arr2) {
  var myObj = {};
  var myArr = [];
  for (var i = 0, len = arr1.length; i < len; i += 1) {
    if(myObj[arr1[i]]) {
      myObj[arr1[i]] += 1; 
    } else {
      myObj[arr1[i]] = 1;
    }
  }
  for (var j = 0, len = arr2.length; j < len; j += 1) {
    if(myObj[arr2[j]] && myArr.indexOf(arr2[j]) === -1) {
      myArr.push(arr2[j]);
    }
  }
  return myArr;
}

Here's a very naive implementation I'm using. It's non-destructive and also makes sure not to duplicate entires.

Array.prototype.contains = function(elem) {
    return(this.indexOf(elem) > -1);
};

Array.prototype.intersect = function( array ) {
    // this is naive--could use some optimization
    var result = [];
    for ( var i = 0; i < this.length; i++ ) {
        if ( array.contains(this[i]) && !result.contains(this[i]) )
            result.push( this[i] );
    }
    return result;
}

I extended tarulen's answer to work with any number of arrays. It also should work with non-integer values.

function intersect() { 
    const last = arguments.length - 1;
    var seen={};
    var result=[];
    for (var i = 0; i < last; i++)   {
        for (var j = 0; j < arguments[i].length; j++)  {
            if (seen[arguments[i][j]])  {
                seen[arguments[i][j]] += 1;
            }
            else if (!i)    {
                seen[arguments[i][j]] = 1;
            }
        }
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments[last].length; i++) {
        if ( seen[arguments[last][i]] === last)
            result.push(arguments[last][i]);
        }
    return result;
}

If your arrays are sorted, this should run in O(n), where n is min( a.length, b.length )

function intersect_1d( a, b ){
    var out=[], ai=0, bi=0, acurr, bcurr, last=Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER;
    while( ( acurr=a[ai] )!==undefined && ( bcurr=b[bi] )!==undefined ){
        if( acurr < bcurr){
            if( last===acurr ){
                out.push( acurr );
            }
            last=acurr;
            ai++;
        }
        else if( acurr > bcurr){
            if( last===bcurr ){
                out.push( bcurr );
            }
            last=bcurr;
            bi++;
        }
        else {
            out.push( acurr );
            last=acurr;
            ai++;
            bi++;
        }
    }
    return out;
}

var arrays = [
    [1, 2, 3],
    [2, 3, 4, 5]
]
function commonValue (...arr) {
    let res = arr[0].filter(function (x) {
        return arr.every((y) => y.includes(x))
    })
    return res;
}
commonValue(...arrays);


function intersectionOfArrays(arr1, arr2) {
    return arr1.filter((element) => arr2.indexOf(element) !== -1).filter((element, pos, self) => self.indexOf(element) == pos);
}