jQuery scroll() detect when user stops scrolling


Ok with this..

$(window).scroll(function()
{
    $('.slides_layover').removeClass('showing_layover');
    $('#slides_effect').show();
});

I can tell when someone is scrolling from what I understand. So with that I am trying to figure out how to catch when someone has stopped. From the above example you can see I am removing a class from a set of elements while the scrolling is occurring. However, I want to put that class back on when the user stops scrolling.

The reason for this is I am intent on having a layover show while the page is scrolling to give the page a special effect I am attempting to work on. But the one class I am trying to remove while scrolling conflicts with that effect as its a transparency effect to some nature.

$(window).scroll(function() {
    clearTimeout($.data(this, 'scrollTimer'));
    $.data(this, 'scrollTimer', setTimeout(function() {
        // do something
        console.log("Haven't scrolled in 250ms!");
    }, 250));
});

Update

I wrote an extension to enhance jQuery's default on-event-handler. It attaches an event handler function for one or more events to the selected elements and calls the handler function if the event was not triggered for a given interval. This is useful if you want to fire a callback only after a delay, like the resize event, or such.

It is important to check the github-repo for updates!

https://github.com/yckart/jquery.unevent.js

;(function ($) {
    var on = $.fn.on, timer;
    $.fn.on = function () {
        var args = Array.apply(null, arguments);
        var last = args[args.length - 1];

        if (isNaN(last) || (last === 1 && args.pop())) return on.apply(this, args);

        var delay = args.pop();
        var fn = args.pop();

        args.push(function () {
            var self = this, params = arguments;
            clearTimeout(timer);
            timer = setTimeout(function () {
                fn.apply(self, params);
            }, delay);
        });

        return on.apply(this, args);
    };
}(this.jQuery || this.Zepto));

Use it like any other on or bind-event handler, except that you can pass an extra parameter as a last:

$(window).on('scroll', function(e) {
    console.log(e.type + '-event was 250ms not triggered');
}, 250);

http://yckart.github.com/jquery.unevent.js/

(this demo uses resize instead of scroll, but who cares?!)


Using jQuery throttle / debounce

jQuery debounce is a nice one for problems like this. jsFidlle

$(window).scroll($.debounce( 250, true, function(){
    $('#scrollMsg').html('SCROLLING!');
}));
$(window).scroll($.debounce( 250, function(){
    $('#scrollMsg').html('DONE!');
}));

The second parameter is the "at_begin" flag. Here I've shown how to execute code both at "scroll start" and "scroll finish".

Using Lodash

As suggested by Barry P, jsFiddle, underscore or lodash also have a debounce, each with slightly different apis.

$(window).scroll(_.debounce(function(){
    $('#scrollMsg').html('SCROLLING!');
}, 150, { 'leading': true, 'trailing': false }));

$(window).scroll(_.debounce(function(){
    $('#scrollMsg').html('STOPPED!');
}, 150));

Rob W suggected I check out another post here on stack that was essentially a similar post to my original one. Which reading through that I found a link to a site:

http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/special-scroll-events-for-jquery/

This actually ended up helping solve my problem very nicely after a little tweaking for my own needs, but over all helped get a lot of the guff out of the way and saved me about 4 hours of figuring it out on my own.

Seeing as this post seems to have some merit, I figured I would come back and provide the code found originally on the link mentioned, just in case the author ever decided to go a different direction with the site and ended up taking down the link.

(function(){

    var special = jQuery.event.special,
        uid1 = 'D' + (+new Date()),
        uid2 = 'D' + (+new Date() + 1);

    special.scrollstart = {
        setup: function() {

            var timer,
                handler =  function(evt) {

                    var _self = this,
                        _args = arguments;

                    if (timer) {
                        clearTimeout(timer);
                    } else {
                        evt.type = 'scrollstart';
                        jQuery.event.handle.apply(_self, _args);
                    }

                    timer = setTimeout( function(){
                        timer = null;
                    }, special.scrollstop.latency);

                };

            jQuery(this).bind('scroll', handler).data(uid1, handler);

        },
        teardown: function(){
            jQuery(this).unbind( 'scroll', jQuery(this).data(uid1) );
        }
    };

    special.scrollstop = {
        latency: 300,
        setup: function() {

            var timer,
                    handler = function(evt) {

                    var _self = this,
                        _args = arguments;

                    if (timer) {
                        clearTimeout(timer);
                    }

                    timer = setTimeout( function(){

                        timer = null;
                        evt.type = 'scrollstop';
                        jQuery.event.handle.apply(_self, _args);

                    }, special.scrollstop.latency);

                };

            jQuery(this).bind('scroll', handler).data(uid2, handler);

        },
        teardown: function() {
            jQuery(this).unbind( 'scroll', jQuery(this).data(uid2) );
        }
    };

})();

I agreed with some of the comments above that listening for a timeout wasn't accurate enough as that will trigger when you stop moving the scroll bar for long enough instead of when you stop scrolling. I think a better solution is to listen for the user letting go of the mouse (mouseup) as soon as they start scrolling:

$(window).scroll(function(){
    $('#scrollMsg').html('SCROLLING!');
    var stopListener = $(window).mouseup(function(){ // listen to mouse up
        $('#scrollMsg').html('STOPPED SCROLLING!');
        stopListner(); // Stop listening to mouse up after heard for the first time 
    });
});

and an example of it working can be seen in this JSFiddle


You could set an interval that runs every 500 ms or so, along the lines of the following:

var curOffset, oldOffset;
oldOffset = $(window).scrollTop();
var $el = $('.slides_layover'); // cache jquery ref
setInterval(function() {
  curOffset = $(window).scrollTop();
  if(curOffset != oldOffset) {
    // they're scrolling, remove your class here if it exists
    if($el.hasClass('showing_layover')) $el.removeClass('showing_layover');
  } else {
    // they've stopped, add the class if it doesn't exist
    if(!$el.hasClass('showing_layover')) $el.addClass('showing_layover');
  }
  oldOffset = curOffset;
}, 500);

I haven't tested this code, but the principle should work.


function scrolled() {
    //do by scroll start
    $(this).off('scroll')[0].setTimeout(function(){
        //do by scroll end
        $(this).on('scroll',scrolled);
    }, 500)
}
$(window).on('scroll',scrolled);

very small Version with start and end ability


Ok this is something that I've used before. Basically you look a hold a ref to the last scrollTop(). Once your timeout clears, you check the current scrollTop() and if they are the same, you are done scrolling.

$(window).scroll((e) ->
  clearTimeout(scrollTimer)
  $('header').addClass('hidden')

  scrollTimer = setTimeout((() ->
    if $(this).scrollTop() is currentScrollTop
      $('header').removeClass('hidden') 
  ), animationDuration)

  currentScrollTop = $(this).scrollTop()
)

ES6 style with checking scrolling start also.

function onScrollHandler(params: {
  onStart: () => void,
  onStop: () => void,
  timeout: number
}) {
  const {onStart, onStop, timeout = 200} = params
  let timer = null

  return (event) => {
    if (timer) {
      clearTimeout(timer)
    } else {
      onStart && onStart(event)
    }
    timer = setTimeout(() => {
      timer = null
      onStop && onStop(event)
    }, timeout)
  }
}

Usage:

yourScrollableElement.addEventListener('scroll', onScrollHandler({
  onStart: (event) => {
    console.log('Scrolling has started')
  },
  onStop: (event) => {
    console.log('Scrolling has stopped')
  },
  timeout: 123 // Remove to use default value
}))

please check the jquery mobile scrollstop event

$(document).on("scrollstop",function(){
  alert("Stopped scrolling!");
});

For those Who Still Need This Here Is The Solution

  $(function(){
      var t;
      document.addEventListener('scroll',function(e){
          clearTimeout(t);
          checkScroll();
      });
      
      function checkScroll(){
          t = setTimeout(function(){
             alert('Done Scrolling');
          },500); /* You can increase or reduse timer */
      }
  });


This should work:

var Timer;
$('.Scroll_Table_Div').on("scroll",function() 
{
    // do somethings

    clearTimeout(Timer);
    Timer = setTimeout(function()
    {
        console.log('scrolling is stop');
    },50);
});

Here is how you can handle this:

    var scrollStop = function (callback) {
        if (!callback || typeof callback !== 'function') return;
        var isScrolling;
        window.addEventListener('scroll', function (event) {
            window.clearTimeout(isScrolling);
            isScrolling = setTimeout(function() {
                callback();
            }, 66);
        }, false);
    };
    scrollStop(function () {
        console.log('Scrolling has stopped.');
    });
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title>Title</title>
</head>
<body>
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</body>
</html>


This detects the scroll stop after 1 milisecond (or change it) using a global timer:

var scrollTimer;

$(window).on("scroll",function(){
    clearTimeout(scrollTimer);
    //Do  what you want whilst scrolling
    scrollTimer=setTimeout(function(){afterScroll()},1);
})

function afterScroll(){
    //I catched scroll stop.
}